25% Sale

25% Sale

18, 19, 20 August

25% off tiles & pavers, 20% off bullnose & coping, 20% off sealers, 10% off fixing materials.
1/2 price delivery for goods delivered by 31st August, Metro area only!
Excludes stacked stone cladding.

Bluestone Garden Edging DIY

Bluestone Garden Edging – DIY Guide

Apprehensive of using stone to make DIY garden edging? This garden edging in our display area was made by a 19 year old with no landscaping or gardening experience at all. [Read more…]

Basalt Pavers Round in Garden show

Basalt Pavers Round Shape

Basalt Pavers/Bluestone round shape features in one of the achievable garden project in this year’s Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show. Bulleen Art & Garden is one of our wholesalers and supply this project.

Basalt also call Bluestone in Victoria, Australia, Edwards Slate & Stone was the first Australian company to import Bluestone for the domestic market, our experience counts.

Achievable gardens

[Read more…]

Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show Special Offer

MIFGS Garden Show Special Offer

Edwards Slate & Stone is celebrating Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show by offering 25% off! This garden show special offer covering all Bluestone pavers and tiles except for Pool coping tiles ex. drop face tiles, bullnose pavers and Arris edge pavers.

Offer valid until 31st March, excludes pool coping tiles, stacked stone cladding, stone sealers and fixing materials.

Edwards Slate & Stone [Read more…]

Which Is The Best Bluestone?

Which Is The Best Bluestone?

An Overview

Which Is The Best Bluestone? This is a commonly asked question and the answer is not straightforward. Without going into the technical aspects of Bluestone, which this article does not attempt to do, I will try to give a summary of the situation in Victoria as it stands now. For those who like the science behind this summary, a good article to read is contained within Discovering Stone issue 22 2012.

Since the foundation of Melbourne City Bluestone, which has the geological name of Basalt, has featured strongly in our churches, walls, foundation stones and all aspects of building. Our local Bluestone responds well to traditional methods of fixing using mortar (a mix of sand and cement). As a result Bluestone had an excellent reputation as a building product.

In 2005 Edwards Slate & Stone imported a variety of Bluestone that closely resembled the Australian variety of Bluestone from a part of China in both colour, pore size and the distribution of larger holes which is locally called “cats paw”. This type of Bluestone was substantially cheaper than the Australian variety and as a result started the resurgence of Bluestone as a tile in the domestic housing sector. This type of Bluestone could be laid in the traditional manner using mortar, the only slight disadvantage was that it sometimes contained a minimal amount of iron than the locally quarried Bluestone and as a result an occasional tile could discolour slightly. This can be neutralised with certain easy to obtain chemicals.

In 2011 we became aware that there were a number of failures to do with fixing Bluestone in Brisbane and Sydney. Up until then we had not heard of any failures in Melbourne. In 2012, as best as we can tell, large volumes of Chinese fine pored bluestone began to be imported into Melbourne and with this the number of failures to do with fixing began to rise. When we say Chinese Bluestone I should qualify what this means. The two main areas for quarrying Bluestone In China are around 1400kms apart, that is from about Melbourne to Coffs Harbour in distance. The nature and quality of the Bluestone varies considerably depending on where it is quarried. On this basis it is impossible to say “All Chinese Bluestone is bad” or “All Chinese Bluestone is good”, it really depends on where it is quarried and other factors such as thickness and size, which this article does not attempt to discuss.

Between 2013 and the date of this article, very large volumes of a particular type of fine grained Chinese Bluestone has been imported into Victoria and the resulting failures during the fixing process has increased alarmingly when this stone was used.

So this leaves us with two questions. The first is why are importers choosing this new type of fine grained Chinese Bluestone and secondly how would it be laid successfully if you cannot use a traditional method?

The first is easy to answer. Originally I do not believe importers realised that they were importing a variety of Bluestone that could not be laid using traditional methods. And the price of the fine pored material was cheaper and could undercut the existing variety of bluestone on the market, so it was easy to gain considerable market share quickly.

Secondly the market demanded a consistent colour and fine grained finish, both of which this new variety of Bluestone displayed.

Unfortunately the results for the end user could be catastrophic when regularly the entire bond between the mortar and the tiles failed in the first few hours after fixing. We have also heard many reports that even if adhesive is spread onto the tile before fixing into mortar the bond still breaks.

What Is The Solution?

We suggest purchase from a well established company with a good reputation. Ask the supplier, “Is this Bluestone suitable for use using traditional fixing methods?’ And be wary, a substantially cheaper price may not always save money in the short and long term.

Conclusion

A good quality Bluestone from China will last a lifetime and provide an easy to care for and slip resistant surface. The colour never dates and compliments modern and traditional homes, and the range of complimentary bullnose and drop face for pool coping tiles is second to none. I have chosen Chinese Bluestone for my own home and the results have been outstanding.

Steven Edwards

Bluestone Pavers Online Melbourne

Bluestone Pavers Online Melbourne

This is an inspiring Bluestone garden project in Canterbury. The rectangular elements contained within this setting combine and complement each other. Edward Slate and Stone provide bluestone pavers online Melbourne or, visit our showroom.

All About Bluestone

There are two distinct building materials called bluestone in Australia. In Victoria, what is known as bluestone is a basalt or olivine basalt. It was one of the favoured building materials during the Victorian Gold Rush period of the 1850s. In Melbourne it was extracted from quarries throughout the inner northern suburbs, such as Clifton Hill, Brunswick and Coburg, where the quarry used to source the stone for Pentridge Prison is now Coburg Lake.[7][8] Bluestone was also sourced in many other regions of the Victorian volcanic plains, and used in towns and cities of central and western regions, including Ballarat, Geelong, Kyneton, Port Fairy and Portland. It is still quarried at a number of places around the state.

Bluestone is very hard and therefore difficult to work, so it was predominantly used for warehouses, miscellaneous walls, and the foundations of buildings. However, a number of significant bluestone buildings exist, including the Old Melbourne Gaol, Pentridge Prison, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne Grammar School, Deaf Children Australia and Victorian College for the Deaf, Vision Australia, the Goldsbrough Mort warehouses (Bourke Street) and the Timeball Tower, as well as St Mary’s Basilica in Geelong. Some examples of other major structures that use bluestone include Princes Bridge, the adjacent Federation Wharf, and Hawthorn Bridge. Because of its distinctive qualities, post-modern Melbourne buildings have also made use of bluestone for nostalgic reasons. These include the Southgate complex and promenade in Southbank, Victoria, and apartment buildings such as the Melburnian.

Bluestone was also used extensively as cobblestone, and for kerbs and gutters, many examples which still exist in some of Melbourne’s smaller city lanes and 19th Century inner suburban lanes. Crushed bluestone aggregate, known as bluemetal, is still used extensively in Victoria as railway ballast, road base, and, combined with bitumen, as road surfacing material, as well as in concrete making.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Bluestone Pavers Online Melbourne Gallery

Bluestone Pavers in Melbourne & Country Victoria

Bluestone Paver Suppliers Melbourne – Basalt Display

Bluestone Paver Suppliers Melbourne

Since Edwards Slate & Stone release Basalt round pavers in Victoria’s market, it becomes one of the most popular paving stones in Melbourne, this path here in front of our showroom demonstrates how you can put small pieces together and create a natural pattern. Edwards Slate & Stone are bluestone paver suppliers Melbourne.

All About Bluestone

There are two distinct building materials called bluestone in Australia. In Victoria, what is known as bluestone is a basalt or olivine basalt. It was one of the favoured building materials during the Victorian Gold Rush period of the 1850s. In Melbourne it was extracted from quarries throughout the inner northern suburbs, such as Clifton Hill, Brunswick and Coburg, where the quarry used to source the stone for Pentridge Prison is now Coburg Lake.[7][8] Bluestone was also sourced in many other regions of the Victorian volcanic plains, and used in towns and cities of central and western regions, including Ballarat, Geelong, Kyneton, Port Fairy and Portland. It is still quarried at a number of places around the state.

Bluestone is very hard and therefore difficult to work, so it was predominantly used for warehouses, miscellaneous walls, and the foundations of buildings. However, a number of significant bluestone buildings exist, including the Old Melbourne Gaol, Pentridge Prison, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne Grammar School, Deaf Children Australia and Victorian College for the Deaf, Vision Australia, the Goldsbrough Mort warehouses (Bourke Street) and the Timeball Tower, as well as St Mary’s Basilica in Geelong. Some examples of other major structures that use bluestone include Princes Bridge, the adjacent Federation Wharf, and Hawthorn Bridge. Because of its distinctive qualities, post-modern Melbourne buildings have also made use of bluestone for nostalgic reasons. These include the Southgate complex and promenade in Southbank, Victoria, and apartment buildings such as the Melburnian.

Bluestone was also used extensively as cobblestone, and for kerbs and gutters, many examples which still exist in some of Melbourne’s smaller city lanes and 19th Century inner suburban lanes. Crushed bluestone aggregate, known as bluemetal, is still used extensively in Victoria as railway ballast, road base, and, combined with bitumen, as road surfacing material, as well as in concrete making.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Bluestone Paver Suppiers Online Melbourne Gallery

Bluestone Paver Suppliers in Melbourne & Country Victoria

Bluestone Paver Sale Melbourne

Bluestone Paver Sale Melbourne

It’s a great time to buy Bluestone for outdoor paving, this September during our spring sale. See Edwards Slate & Stone for bluestone paver sale Melbourne.

All About Bluestone

There are two distinct building materials called bluestone in Australia. In Victoria, what is known as bluestone is a basalt or olivine basalt. It was one of the favoured building materials during the Victorian Gold Rush period of the 1850s. In Melbourne it was extracted from quarries throughout the inner northern suburbs, such as Clifton Hill, Brunswick and Coburg, where the quarry used to source the stone for Pentridge Prison is now Coburg Lake.[7][8] Bluestone was also sourced in many other regions of the Victorian volcanic plains, and used in towns and cities of central and western regions, including Ballarat, Geelong, Kyneton, Port Fairy and Portland. It is still quarried at a number of places around the state.

Bluestone is very hard and therefore difficult to work, so it was predominantly used for warehouses, miscellaneous walls, and the foundations of buildings. However, a number of significant bluestone buildings exist, including the Old Melbourne Gaol, Pentridge Prison, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne Grammar School, Deaf Children Australia and Victorian College for the Deaf, Vision Australia, the Goldsbrough Mort warehouses (Bourke Street) and the Timeball Tower, as well as St Mary’s Basilica in Geelong. Some examples of other major structures that use bluestone include Princes Bridge, the adjacent Federation Wharf, and Hawthorn Bridge. Because of its distinctive qualities, post-modern Melbourne buildings have also made use of bluestone for nostalgic reasons. These include the Southgate complex and promenade in Southbank, Victoria, and apartment buildings such as the Melburnian.

Bluestone was also used extensively as cobblestone, and for kerbs and gutters, many examples which still exist in some of Melbourne’s smaller city lanes and 19th Century inner suburban lanes. Crushed bluestone aggregate, known as bluemetal, is still used extensively in Victoria as railway ballast, road base, and, combined with bitumen, as road surfacing material, as well as in concrete making.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Bluestone Paver Suppiers Online Melbourne Gallery

Bluestone Paver Sale in Melbourne & Country Victoria

Bluestone Paver Range Melbourne Bluestone Planter Box

Bluestone Paver Range Melbourne

Planter box with Bluestone capping tiles from Edwards Slate & Stone. See Edwards Slate & Stone bluestone paver range Melbourne.

All About Bluestone

There are two distinct building materials called bluestone in Australia. In Victoria, what is known as bluestone is a basalt or olivine basalt. It was one of the favoured building materials during the Victorian Gold Rush period of the 1850s. In Melbourne it was extracted from quarries throughout the inner northern suburbs, such as Clifton Hill, Brunswick and Coburg, where the quarry used to source the stone for Pentridge Prison is now Coburg Lake.[7][8] Bluestone was also sourced in many other regions of the Victorian volcanic plains, and used in towns and cities of central and western regions, including Ballarat, Geelong, Kyneton, Port Fairy and Portland. It is still quarried at a number of places around the state.

Bluestone is very hard and therefore difficult to work, so it was predominantly used for warehouses, miscellaneous walls, and the foundations of buildings. However, a number of significant bluestone buildings exist, including the Old Melbourne Gaol, Pentridge Prison, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne Grammar School, Deaf Children Australia and Victorian College for the Deaf, Vision Australia, the Goldsbrough Mort warehouses (Bourke Street) and the Timeball Tower, as well as St Mary’s Basilica in Geelong. Some examples of other major structures that use bluestone include Princes Bridge, the adjacent Federation Wharf, and Hawthorn Bridge. Because of its distinctive qualities, post-modern Melbourne buildings have also made use of bluestone for nostalgic reasons. These include the Southgate complex and promenade in Southbank, Victoria, and apartment buildings such as the Melburnian.

Bluestone was also used extensively as cobblestone, and for kerbs and gutters, many examples which still exist in some of Melbourne’s smaller city lanes and 19th Century inner suburban lanes. Crushed bluestone aggregate, known as bluemetal, is still used extensively in Victoria as railway ballast, road base, and, combined with bitumen, as road surfacing material, as well as in concrete making.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Bluestone Paver Range Online Melbourne Gallery

Bluestone Paver Range in Melbourne & Country Victoria

Bluestone Paver Price Melbourne Basalt Random Crazy Path

Best Bluestone Paver Price Melbourne

Basalt random crazy works well with all types of architecture and garden designs. See Edwards Slate & Stone for bluestone paver price Melbourne.

All About Bluestone

There are two distinct building materials called bluestone in Australia. In Victoria, what is known as bluestone is a basalt or olivine basalt. It was one of the favoured building materials during the Victorian Gold Rush period of the 1850s. In Melbourne it was extracted from quarries throughout the inner northern suburbs, such as Clifton Hill, Brunswick and Coburg, where the quarry used to source the stone for Pentridge Prison is now Coburg Lake.[7][8] Bluestone was also sourced in many other regions of the Victorian volcanic plains, and used in towns and cities of central and western regions, including Ballarat, Geelong, Kyneton, Port Fairy and Portland. It is still quarried at a number of places around the state.

Bluestone is very hard and therefore difficult to work, so it was predominantly used for warehouses, miscellaneous walls, and the foundations of buildings. However, a number of significant bluestone buildings exist, including the Old Melbourne Gaol, Pentridge Prison, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne Grammar School, Deaf Children Australia and Victorian College for the Deaf, Vision Australia, the Goldsbrough Mort warehouses (Bourke Street) and the Timeball Tower, as well as St Mary’s Basilica in Geelong. Some examples of other major structures that use bluestone include Princes Bridge, the adjacent Federation Wharf, and Hawthorn Bridge. Because of its distinctive qualities, post-modern Melbourne buildings have also made use of bluestone for nostalgic reasons. These include the Southgate complex and promenade in Southbank, Victoria, and apartment buildings such as the Melburnian.

Bluestone was also used extensively as cobblestone, and for kerbs and gutters, many examples which still exist in some of Melbourne’s smaller city lanes and 19th Century inner suburban lanes. Crushed bluestone aggregate, known as bluemetal, is still used extensively in Victoria as railway ballast, road base, and, combined with bitumen, as road surfacing material, as well as in concrete making.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Bluestone Paver Prices Online Melbourne Gallery

Bluestone Paver Range in Melbourne & Country Victoria